9 Tips For Managing Your Customer Receivables

Having Accounts Receivable i.e. amounts owing by customers is both good and bad.  It's good because it means that you have sales and customers.  It's bad because it is cash that you don't have now, and there is always a possibility that you won't collect.  When you offer credit terms to your customers it is extremely important to have a system in place to manage your accounts receivable.  It is difficult to collect amounts due when you don't actually know how much you are owed or when it is due.  Having the information at your fingertips  (this really relates to any kind of information) also makes a great impression. Below are some steps to help manage and collect on your accounts receivable:
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Tax Tip: Write Off 100% of Computer Hardware

Small Business owners should note that for electronic data processing equipment i.e. computer hardware and related software acquired between January 27, 2009 and January 31, 2011, the entire amount of the purchase can be deducted against income.  This is a significant incentive for business owners to purchase computer equipment before February, 2011.  The accelerated depreciation rate is 100%.  and there is no half year rule.  The usual CCA rate for computer hardware, which is subject to the half year rule (i..e 15% in the first year) is 30%.   To qualify the hardware must be:

  • situated in Canada

  • new equipment

  • used by a business that is conducted in Canada

The applicable CCA Class to select when preparing your tax return is 52.

More information can be found at the CRA website Classes of depreciable property:

Related: Accounting and tax implications of fixed assets 

About the author: Ronika Khanna is an accounting and finance professional who helps small businesses achieve their financial goals.  Please sign up to receive articles pertaining to small business, accounting, tax and other occasional non business topics of interest.  You can also follow her on Facebook or Twitter.

NeatDesk Scanner: Effective Bookkeeping Tool?

As an accountant, I occasionally (literally) get shoeboxes of documents from my small business clients.  Receipts are stuffed in and scrunched up and comprise everything from gas (good) to toilet paper (bad).  As I contemplate the mind numbing exercise where I will have to sift through everything, identify missing information and worst of all, enter it all into an accounting software (usually Quickbooks), I often feel a sense of dread.  I've often fantasized about a tool that could do it all for me (of course I could outsource, but since I only have a handful of these types of clients, it is not worth it, yet...). So, when I saw an ad for the Neatdesk Scanner (shown frequently on CNBC), I felt a little bit of glee as I perceived a potential solution to (at least part of ) the problem. 

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