Consider These Financial and Tax Implications When Buying a Home

The Canadian real estate market has been a good place to invest in recent years, although comparisons to the US real estate bubble, which finally culminated in 2008, are continuing to intensify. Potential homeowners often find themselves seduced by their vision of the perfect home in the perfect neighbourhood and end up in a difficult situation, referred to as “house poor”, where the majority of their disposable income goes to paying down their mortgages.  This can be avoided by ensuring that you realistically assess what you can afford and being financially responsible. 

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9 Tips for Building a Sales Forecast

Having a dynamic, regularly updated sales forecast can be essential to the success of a small business.   By forecasting your sales revenue you are helping to control for its unpredictability, an inherent risk in any business venture, and prepare for the decisions that are essential to your business profitability.  Whether your sales are increasing, decreasing or static , it is always better when decisions are made proactively rather than reactively. 

Preparing a sales forecast can be as simple as you want it to be and does not necessarily require an accounting degree, particularly when your business is small (although an experienced accountant can certainly help refine and streamline the process).  Below are some tips to help you prepare your sales forecast:

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3 Provisions from the 2011 Federal Budget that Benefit Small Businesses

Although the 2011 federal budget tabled in March was not directly responsible for an election, a change in government and one of the most interesting election results in recent history, it was certainly a contributing factor.  When the excitement was over however, the budget pretty much remained the same.  The budget’s primary focus is the economy and includes provisions to stimulate jobs and growth, while, for the most part, maintaining current tax rates.  Some provisions that impact small business are discussed below:

Temporary Hiring Credit 

A one-time credit of up to $1,000 based on the increase in an employer's employment insurance (EI) premiums paid for 2011 over those paid for 2010. 

Small businesses whose EI premiums were less than $10,000 in 2010 and whose premiums increased in 2011 from 2010, are eligible for a one time credit.  The credit will be automatically calculated when you submit your T4s and summaries for 2011.  The deadline, to be eligible for the credit, is January 15, 2015 (if you haven’t filed your T4s by this time, you probably have bigger problems). 

Note that you cannot reduce your payroll deductions by the amounts anticipated.  You must wait for the CRA assessment subsequent to filing your T4 returns.

Further info can be found here

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14 Year End Organization, Financial and Tax Tips to Manage Your Personal Finances

As a chronic procrastinator I tend put all my non “attend to immediately” documents in baskets and boxes resulting in, at year end, a colourful array of documents.  There are letters, bills, invoices, receipts, statements and the occasional delivery menu that did not get filtered out.  The intention is to organize them, on a regular basis, in the near future.  In reality, this usually does not tend to happen until the end of the year.

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10 Year End Financial and Tax Tips for Your Small Business

As the end of the year approaches, some of us find ourselves overwhelmed by top 10 lists, the shopping masses and endless renditions of Winter Wonderland.  Businesses, on the other hand, tend to experience a slowdown, which makes it the perfect time for small business owners (when not partaking in holiday madness) to take a closer look at their overall business, financial and tax situation.  A thorough review and analysis of your business will allow you to optimize your current financial situation as well as prepare for the future. 

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How to Prepare a Business Budget

One of the primary challenges facing a small business owner is uncertainty about the future. (It is also what makes entrepreneurship exciting).  We may have an amazing product or service, but we can’t be sure whether this will actually translate into a profitable business model.  A budget is an excellent tool to manage uncertainty and, contrary to popular belief, can actually be fairly straightforward to prepare, particularly for small businesses that do not have to worry about different departments, product lines and geographic areas .

A budget, very simply, is a tool that helps you predict your sales, expenses and profitability as well as your cash flow needs.  It is based on estimates, which in turn are based on a combination of experience, history and industry knowledge. In terms of presentation, a budget should essentially mirror your financial statements and will include the following main categories:

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